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The #StigmaStops campaign run by the World Hepatitis Alliance is a fantastic opportunity for everybody in our community to share their stories and break down the stigma surrounding hepatitis in the run-up to Zero Discrimination Day.

Stigma and discrimination have been a huge issue for many people living with viral hepatitis and it’s a core issue when it comes to achieving our shared goal of eliminating this disease by 2030 and making NOhep a reality!

To get involved with the campaign share your story with #StigmaStops and write on the palm of your hand explaining the discrimination or stigma you have faced, or tell us in the comments section below. With so many misconceptions and myths surrounding viral hepatitis many people simply don’t know the truth and this needs to change.

With education and visibility, we can show the world viral hepatitis does not need to be frightening and we should not be treated any differently. As we break down the barriers we can encourage more people to come forward for testing and diagnostics. We can encourage decision makers to take viral hepatitis seriously and we as a community can put pressure on the world to treat us with the same respect and stop stigma. Click the link to download some fantastic resources.

www.worldhepatitisalliance.org/stigmastops/
... See MoreSee Less

The #StigmaStops campaign run by the World Hepatitis Alliance is a fantastic opportunity for everybody in our community to share their stories and break down the stigma surrounding hepatitis in the run-up to Zero Discrimination Day. 

Stigma and discrimination have been a huge issue for many people living with viral hepatitis and it’s a core issue when it comes to achieving our shared goal of eliminating this disease by 2030 and making NOhep a reality! 

To get involved with the campaign share your story with #StigmaStops and write on the palm of your hand explaining the discrimination or stigma you have faced, or tell us in the comments section below. With so many misconceptions and myths surrounding viral hepatitis many people simply don’t know the truth and this needs to change. 

With education and visibility, we can show the world viral hepatitis does not need to be frightening and we should not be treated any differently. As we break down the barriers we can encourage more people to come forward for testing and diagnostics. We can encourage decision makers to take viral hepatitis seriously and we as a community can put pressure on the world to treat us with the same respect and stop stigma. Click the link to download some fantastic resources.

http://www.worldhepatitisalliance.org/stigmastops/

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NOhep added 3 new photos.

Only 1 in 2 newborns have access to cancer preventing vaccines

On World Cancer Day (4 February 2018) we are calling on the hepatitis community to join us in demanding that the hepatitis B vaccine is given to all newborns.

Liver Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths globally, accounting for 830,000* deaths a year. Of these deaths, 350,000 are caused by the hepatitis B virus, a chronic virus that effects the liver. These deaths are largely avoidable as it may surprise you to know a vaccine to prevent hepatitis B exists, which can ultimately protect against liver disease and liver cancer. So if we can prevent all these deaths, why aren’t we?

Worldwide, only 52% of countries provide the hepatitis B vaccine to newborns, when it is most effective in preventing hepatitis B. This means half of the world’s children are still missing out on this potentially live saving treatment. Due to lack of political will to properly tackle this disease in the past, hepatitis B has ravaged communities and in turn has contributed highly to the global death toll for liver cancer.

There has however been significant steps made by the global community in the last few years to scale up vaccinations among infants (under age of five) with 84% of children now having been vaccinated. This has resulted in the instances of hepatitis B falling, which goes to show how much impact a simple vaccination can have.

NOhep Ambassador Raquel Peck said; “Coverage of infants is a good start, but to ensure real impact, we need to guarantee newborns are vaccinated in order to prevent both infection that may occur early in life and to protect against potential mother-to-child transmission if the mother is living with hepatitis B.”

Time for Action

In May 2016, 194 governments committed to eliminating this global disease when they signed up to the Global Viral Hepatitis Strategy set out by the World Health Organization. The strategy includes a target to increase coverage of the hepatitis B birth dose vaccine to 90% by 2030.

On World Cancer Day, we are calling on all NOhep activists, visionaries and supporters to help us raise awareness of this vital issue and hold their government to account, ensuring that the hepatitis B vaccine is part of national immunization and cancer control programmes.

This is our chance to make our voices heard. Join us to eliminate viral hepatitis and prevent needless deaths from liver cancer. #NOhep #WorldCancerDay

*Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). GBD Compare Data Visualization. Seattle, WA: IHME, University of Washington, 2016. Available from vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare. Accessed 30 January 2018.
... See MoreSee Less

Only 1 in 2 newborns have access to cancer preventing vaccines

On World Cancer Day (4 February 2018) we are calling on the hepatitis community to join us in demanding that the hepatitis B vaccine is given to all newborns. 

Liver Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths globally, accounting for 830,000* deaths a year. Of these deaths, 350,000 are caused by the hepatitis B virus, a chronic virus that effects the liver. These deaths are largely avoidable as it may surprise you to know a vaccine to prevent hepatitis B exists, which can ultimately protect against liver disease and liver cancer. So if we can prevent all these deaths, why aren’t we? 

Worldwide, only 52% of countries provide the hepatitis B vaccine to newborns, when it is most effective in preventing hepatitis B. This means half of the world’s children are still missing out on this potentially live saving treatment. Due to lack of political will to properly tackle this disease in the past, hepatitis B has ravaged communities and in turn has contributed highly to the global death toll for liver cancer. 

There has however been significant steps made by the global community in the last few years to scale up vaccinations among infants (under age of five) with 84% of children now having been vaccinated. This has resulted in the instances of hepatitis B falling, which goes to show how much impact a simple vaccination can have.
 
NOhep Ambassador Raquel Peck said; “Coverage of infants is a good start, but to ensure real impact, we need to guarantee newborns are vaccinated in order to prevent both infection that may occur early in life and to protect against potential mother-to-child transmission if the mother is living with hepatitis B.” 

Time for Action 

In May 2016, 194 governments committed to eliminating this global disease when they signed up to the Global Viral Hepatitis Strategy set out by the World Health Organization. The strategy includes a target to increase coverage of the hepatitis B birth dose vaccine to 90% by 2030. 

On World Cancer Day, we are calling on all NOhep activists, visionaries and supporters to help us raise awareness of this vital issue and hold their government to account, ensuring that the hepatitis B vaccine is part of national immunization and cancer control programmes. 

This is our chance to make our voices heard. Join us to eliminate viral hepatitis and prevent needless deaths from liver cancer. #NOhep #WorldCancerDay  

*Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). GBD Compare Data Visualization. Seattle, WA: IHME, University of Washington, 2016. Available from http://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare. Accessed 30 January 2018.

Throwback to NOhep ambassador Raquel Peck making an intervention at the UN in Geneva. She said: "A movement is born and this movement has a name. NOhep. Its goal is the elimination of viral hepatitis and the way to get there is to empower the community and amplify people’s voices." Photo credit: Peter Kenny ... See MoreSee Less

Throwback to NOhep ambassador Raquel Peck making an intervention at the UN in Geneva. She said: A movement is born and this movement has a name. NOhep. Its goal is the elimination of viral hepatitis and the way to get there is to empower the community and amplify people’s voices. Photo credit: Peter Kenny